UNDERSTANDING ASH IN CHEESE
Why are some cheeses coated in ash?

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Coating cheese with ash is a traditional preservation method that has been used for centuries since the beginning of cheese making. Back in the day, the ash was collected from the burning of grapevine clippings. It  protects the cheese from  insects, microbes and mold spore from developing while also keeping the surface of the cheese dry.

Today, cheesemakers use ash from the burning of dried vegetables which is sterile, odourless and tasteless, safe for consumption. Ash coating adds to the aesthetic of the cheeses giving it a unique and striking appearance. On a platter, it is always a great idea to include at least one ash-coated cheese for the colour contrast from the typical light-coloured cheeses.

Here are some of our artisanal ash-coated cheeses.

ARTISANAL CHEESE VS COMMERCIAL CHEESE
Have you ever wondered why a typical Brie vs Brie de Meaux AOC are priced differently? 

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Many people believe that all cheeses such as Brie, Cheddar, Camembert and more, are similar regardless of the producers or its origin. That is totally false. Not all types of Brie, Cheddar and Camembert are of the same flavour and quality. Various methods have been used to produce cheeses over the years and each of them have their own secret recipe. Some producers continue to opt for the traditional methods - Artisanal Cheese, and many others choose modern methods - Commercial Cheese. 

THE MAJOR CHEESE STYLES & HOW THEY ARE MADE
Fresh, Soft, Washed, Hard & Blue

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Cheese comes in many types with well over 1,000 different varieties and of these each producer will have slight nuances that help their cheese stand apart from others. At The Cheese Artisans, we carry over 80 varieties of artisanal cheeses from across UK and Europe. There are 5 main styles of cheeses - Fresh, Soft, Washed Rind, Hard and Blue.

ONE OF THE SMALLEST CHEESES IN THE WORLD
TROU DU CRU - FRANCE


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From the Burgundy region of France, Trou Du Cru is a pungent washed rind cheese, a distinctive category of gloriously stinky curd and a ripening technique first discovered by monks. It is a 60g miniaturised version of famous Epoisses, the smallest cheese in the world, produced since the early 1960s by Robert Berthaut. Washed in Marc de Bourgogne...